Perseverance’s First 360° Panorama with Sound Lets you Feel Like you’re on Mars

Perseverance’s First 360° Panorama with Sound Lets you Feel Like you’re on Mars

NASA’s perseverance rover has captured a new 360° panorama on the surface of Mars that is still the closest thing to what it would look like to stand on a red planet, with audio attached to a wind chime. Interactive video released by NASA lets you plug in headphones and scroll your mouse or finger around and look around you. As you can see Van Jill overlooks, where the stimulus was parked for 13 days watching the first historic historic plane.

You can even see Mars helicopter and rover tracks in the Wright Brothers field when the firmness is apparently spread out in a circle to get a good view. In the distance, you’ll see the rim of Jezero Crater, where Perseverance is now searching to see if it has officially begun its science mission. Of course, perseverance is not a direct recording of what can be seen and heard directly. NASA’s clever people work hard to collect data transmitted by rovers and present it in a way that they can share with the Earth to amaze our Earthlings.

NASA's experimental helicopter Ingenuity flew on dusty red surface of Mars
Perseverance’s First 360° Panorama with Sound Lets you Feel Like you’re on Mars

The 2.4-billion-pixel panorama is made from stitching together 992 images taken by Perseverance’s Right Mastcom-Z between April 15-26, 2021. Additionally, another panorama taken with the cameras taken on March 20 has been added which shows the bottom of the rover decking, as if it were looking at itself. The sky was digitally smoothed and stretched based on the color of the actual sky observed in the days when the images were taken, and the audio recording was actually recorded in February.

However, it is still the closest person to Mars to experience another world, and we are always grateful to the wizards at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for this. On June 1, the persevering Octavia E. Butler landing site began its science phase after weeks of experimentation and a final cut in science, as it surpassed its expectations and flew its wildest successful aircraft. Now, the rover will begin exploring the Jezero Crater, surveying some of the oldest geological features when scientists return to the country to begin bringing its auto-navigation and sampling systems online.

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