We Regret To Inform You the Footage of a Beluga Playing “Catch” Is Not Cute At All

We Regret To Inform You the Footage of a Beluga Playing “Catch” Is Not Cute At All

By now, your source should know: If you see an audio video involving an animal online and it goes viral, be careful. Perhaps in reality something terrible is going on that has not yet revealed. Watch every video of shower rats, baby bulls climbing a mountain, chimps, gorilla-crows and gently Lorries using the iPhone. Each in its own unique way has become more of a story than a first thought – and the rugby-playing beluga whale is probably no exception. If you missed it, a video went viral last week of some “South African rugby fans” playing to bring in an unusually friendly beluga whale.

So long, so adorable. Quickly, enjoy it a few more times before ruining it forever. Here it again, the beluga that only loves sportsball re-shared as a beautiful and irresistible video. Okay, found your system. Now acne yourself, because it’s a weird one: the beluga whale could actually be a former Russian spy whale, now wandering the seas rescued from malnutrition, and desperately need to leave people alone for their own protection.

We Regret To Inform You the Footage of a Beluga Playing Catch Is Not Cute At All
We Regret To Inform You the Footage of a Beluga Playing “Catch” Is Not Cute At All

Science author Ferris Jabr and several other researchers have noted that the whale – which appears to have been depicted in the waters around Norway – may have been a familiar beluga that was seen several times before interacting abnormally with humans that went viral. Beluga whale saves an iPhone from the sea in Norway… pic.twitter.com/BAwFL3nPwK.
– Beauty of the Earth (@PhysicsAnd1) October 21, 2019 most people point to the whale, Hvaldimir, which spotted off the coast of eastern Norway earlier this year.

Beluga, who was apparently man-trained, approached a fishing boat wearing a shoe with the stamp “St Petersburg Equipment” in April, spreading speculation that it could be a Russian spy whale, with the tide used to mount the camera even a weapon. According to The Guardian, Russia is training Belugas to defend naval bases or even kill criminals who enter their waters. “We know that there were domestic whales in captivity in Russia, and some of them have apparently been released. Then they often look for boats, “Audun Rikardsen, a professor at Norway’s Arctic University, told NR at the time.

“If this whale comes from Russia and there is a lot of reason to believe it, it is not the Russian scientists, but the navy that did it,” added Martin Beau of the Marine Research Institute. Since the appearance of Hvaldimir’s, marine biologists have been looking for his weight while trying to survive in human care and captivity. At first, he was not doing well.

Share This Post