Dover Raises $20M to Bring the Concept of ‘Orchestration’ to Recruitment

Dover Raises $20M to Bring the Concept of ‘Orchestration’ to Recruitment

Despite being one of the earliest recipients of global web use to deviate from its business and connect with more potential customers, the recruitment industry is ironically further fragmented and when it comes to using new, cloud-based services to work more efficiently. A new start is hoping to change that and it has raised some money for the strong, early signs. Dover, described by CEO and co-founder Max Kallis as a “recruitment orchestration platform” – designed with employers in mind, helps them to automatically source and pool multiple candidate pools to automatically source their suitable job candidates and then conduct the campaign. (Including the use of tools to automatically rewrite job descriptions, as well as write letters of appointment and rejection) – has collected $20 million from an impressive list of investors.

Tiger Global Series led the round, with founder funds, Abstract Ventures, and Y Combinator also investing. Dover was part of YC’s summer 2019 class (which debuted in August 2020) and the Founder Fund led its seed scholarship. Since releasing the incubator, it has picked up more than 100 customers, including most tech companies, including Clearco, Latics, Samsara, and others, and even larger companies that you assume may already have their own in-house orchestration and automation platforms. In the business world, “orchestration” is commonly used for IT sales and marketing software: in both cases, there is a lot of refutation and work involved in becoming good potential customers, and so both technology companies have created platforms for interesting identification sources and are needed to reach them. Manage a few initial steps and get them involved.

This has proven to be a very appropriate way to think about the recruitment industry, not least because it involves an organization to a degree that “sells” to candidates to get them interested. “I would say hired sales and marketing,” Colish said. “We are comparable to sales ops, but sales in technology are 5-10 years ahead.” Recruiters and hiring managers, especially those working in industries where talent is at a premium and therefore actively hiring good people, can be a challenge to find attractive candidates and consider open jobs to hire them and then manage them. The big process of screening, reaching out to them, and making offers to others is somewhat reluctant.

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