Like the US, a Two-Tier Venture Capital Market is Emerging in Latin America

Like the US, a Two-Tier Venture Capital Market is Emerging in Latin America

Earlier this week, Exchange wrote about the initial series of venture capital markets, with the aim of understanding how some series have raised more seed capital before working on their Series A, while other startups seemingly raise the neophyte stage of scaling around the first letter. The campaign was centered on a comment by Rudina Ceseri of Glasswing Ventures, who said that a large number of seed capital founders in the United States had the opportunity to effectively delay this phase before raising a series.

But after the founders raised to A, their Series B round could quickly follow to show deals in the first round in hopes of snatching ownership at the next-stage fundraising companies. After chatting with Cicero about many more enterprising capitalists about the idea, a second dynamic emerged. For example, according to Cicero’s description, the “normal” initial round of funding rounds was “aggravated by the rise of the prepaid rounds [where] the general expectation window on metrics went out of business.”

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Like the US, a Two-Tier Venture Capital Market is Emerging in Latin America

As the series, he said, the seed deal could come months later, and the Series B rounds saw “big, multaset players come on the market and deliver a different product than ordinary VCs – big, multiset players are shaking the expected revenue threshold very quickly.” Term sheets, no post-investment active involvement, large investment amount and high value”. Just focusing on a dynamic series, the old rule that a startup needs to reach $1 million in annual recurring revenue (ARR) is now often running. Some startups are delaying their A-round until the ARR has $2 million in sufficient seed capital.

While some startups are delaying their A-round, others may raise critical investments before or after, possibly with millions in the ARR. What is the difference between the two groups? Startups with “Elite Status” are able to move forward in their Series A, while other companies spend more time moving around with enough seed capital to attract a while. Dynamics is not just a U.S. phenomenon. The two-tier venture capital market is also emerging in Latin America, an important and rapidly expanding startup region worldwide. (For example, Brazilian fintech startup Nubank has closed for just $750 million).

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