U.S. House Republicans Aim to use Private Sector to Tackle Climate Change

U.S. House Republicans Aim to use Private Sector to Tackle Climate Change

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – More than 50 Republicans formed a group in the U.S. House of Representatives on Wednesday to discuss how to use the free market to fight climate change, as an example of the growing willingness of some in the party to tackle global warming. . The Conservative Climate Caucus, led by Utah Representative John Curtis, includes representatives from each House committee, including jurisdiction over climate policy. Democrats briefly control the House.

Curtis said the group, which represents about a quarter of the House Republican caucus, aims to bring together Republicans to discuss innovation and resource use to cut greenhouse gas emissions while increasing prosperity. “We care about the climate, and we already have solutions and plan to look further,” he said. Some Republicans, however, have ignored the severity of the climate change issue and others have called it a hoax. Former President Donald Trump dismissed the issue for violating climate policies and regulations on fossil fuels.

President Joe Biden, a Democrat, hopes to move further climate initiatives in the $1.7 trillion infrastructure bill, but Republicans in the Senate, where Democrats have effective control, say such proposals are not considered infrastructure. If the measures don’t turn into its broader bill, Democrats might consider legally passing climate initiatives to vote on a party line through a method called budget reconciliation. The Conservatives are also organizing at the grassroots level to promote climate change as a private sector solution.

Earlier this month, the American Conservation Coalition took the bill as the country’s first conservative climate assembly. The decisions that conservative leaders and lawmakers are making include building more buildings out of wood, planting trillions of trees around the world, increasing the use of emissions-free hydropower, and expanding research and expansion of advanced nuclear energy. Earlier this month, the American Conservation Coalition took the bill as the country’s first conservative climate assembly. The decisions that conservative leaders and lawmakers are making include building more buildings out of wood, planting trillions of trees around the world, increasing the use of emissions-free hydropower, and expanding research and expansion of advanced nuclear energy.

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