UK Police Test Jet Suit to Chase Criminals Down

UK Police Test Jet Suit to Chase Criminals Down

Thinking that they could make money quickly, a short-term thief enters a jewelry store and demands all their money. They packed their bags and went down the street, leaving the police who are now just getting in their cars. The thief looked back and saw an officer flying towards them at a speed of 137 km / h (85 mph), jet engines attached to their limbs. Like the possibility of a thief? The UK police force doesn’t do that either, which is why they’re recently testing the Gravity Industries jet suit to make it easier to catch crooks.

In an exhibition on the potential application of jet suits in policing, founder and chief test pilot Richard Browning took to the skies in a simulated high-speed chase scene. One of the gunmen was stopped at a police checkpoint but quickly fled. Browning was then called into action, which then empowered the case and blew up before the perpetrators, landed in front, and drew a weapon to subdue them. The protest was held in front of police chiefs and government officials in Salisbury, England, and shocked many – although Martin Hewitt, chairman of the National Police Chiefs Council, called it “a bit noisy”. This price you pay for 1,000 horsepower in two small jets. Considering the new technology, in the coming years, the police can fly in the air and wear jet suits to catch criminals.

Senior police and government officials have been able to see a human jet suit at an exhibition of new science and technology that could help fight crime and terrorism. In a fictional scene at the Defense Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) in Porton Down, near Salisbury, the pilot flew through the air and hit an attacker who was running.

Richard Browning, pictured, demonstrates gravity at the Defense Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) in Porton Down. Browning using a high-tech system to chase a suspect in front of senior police officers and Home Office staff, photo (right). A few seconds later, the suspect, wearing a black and white striped top, Mr. Just a few yards from Browning Although there are no immediate plans to buy and use the kit, Martin Hewitt, chairman of the National Police Chiefs Council – who was present with Home Office officials – said the event was “something important and exciting.” “Determine where it can be used in the police world “.

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